University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Read For Action: 

Climate, Conflict & Humanitarian Crisis

Co-sponsored by the IHGC, United Nations, UVA Humanitarian Collaborative, and the Environmental Resilience Institute, Read for Action brings readers together to discuss contemporary novels about humanitarian crises intertwined with climate and environmental justice issues.

Learn more at https://www.readforaction.org/

Frameworks for the Future:

The Environment, Climate Change and the Anthropocene

Lecture by Julia Adeney Thomas, University of Notre Dame
10:30-12:00pm, Thursday, February 23, Wilson Hall 142

Premodern Encounters, Spring 2023 Colloqium Series 

Feb 2 - ​"Race and Empire in the Premodern World," Shao-yun Yang, Denison University and Michael Gomez, NYU

Mar 30 - "Premodern Textual Cultures," Marina Rustow, Princeton University and Daniel Wakelin, University of Oxford

April 13 - "Premodern Ecologies and Environments," Lydia Barnett, Northwestern University and Adam Goldwyn, North Dakota State University. 

Click here for additional information

Futurities Lecture Series

The year-long IHGC lecture series features humanists, scientists, writers, artists, and policy experts who explore burning questions about our unfolding futures.

See the Spring 2023 Lineup

Human/ties

Humanities Week 2022
Learn More

Annual Report 2021-22

VIEW

About the Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures

The Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) offers a vision at once local and global, and a mission both academic and socially engaged.

LEARN MORE

 

News & Announcements

Thu Feb 02
Premodern Encounters Colloquium, "Race and Empire in the Premodern World"

Premodern Encounters Colloquium, "Race and Empire in the Premodern World"

Speakers for this colloqium event are Shao-yun Yang, Denison University, author of The Way of the Barbarians: Redrawing Ethnic Boundaries in Tang and Song China (2019) and Michael Gomez, NYU, author of African Dominion: A New History of Empire in Early and Medieval West Africa (2018).

 

Each colloquium brings together two scholars whose recent work engages with similar themes from different cultural and temporal eras. Rather than delivering formal talks, speakers will initiate a dialogue that places their related works in conversation. Participants are encouraged to have read their books in advance and will be invited to attend a casual pre-discussion of these works prior to the colloquium. Hard copy and .pdfs of scholarship will be made available to colloquium participants upon request.  Contact Deborah McGrady (dlm4z@virginia.edu) for information.

[field_location]


5:00-7:00 PM (EST) | In Person (Location TBD)
Fri Feb 03
Samhita Sunya, Mellon Book Talk, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay"

Samhita Sunya, Mellon Book Talk, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay"

Samhita Sundya is an assistant professor of cinema in the department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Her interests span world film history, feminist historiography, informal practices of media distribution across South / West Asia and the Indian Ocean, intersections of audio-visual media and literary forms, and sound studies. Her book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema Via Bombay (U California Press 2022) historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War and renders an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. She currently directs the undergraduate Distinguished Majors Program in MESALC at UVA and serves on the executive committee of the Screen Arts and Culture forum of the Modern Language Association. 

[field_location]


10-11:30 AM EST | Online
Thu Feb 16
Killian Quigley (ACU), "Depth Figures: Oceanic Futures, Submarine Remains”

Killian Quigley (ACU), "Depth Figures: Oceanic Futures, Submarine Remains”

Register here.

 

Dr Killian Quigley

Dr Killian Quigley is Research Fellow at the Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences. He earned his PhD in English at Vanderbilt, where he specialized in the relationship between natural history and the aesthetics of spectacle in eighteenth-century Britain and France. He was subsequently awarded the inaugural postdoc at the Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney.

 

Killian’s primary works reside at the intersections of the environmental humanities, literary studies, the history and philosophy of science, and aesthetic theory. His first book, Reading Underwater Wreckage: An Encrusting Ocean (2023), furnishes a novel theoretical model for interpreting shipwrecks and other drowned matters as junctures of artefact and ecofact, human remains and emergent ecologies, and so forth. A second, and well-advanced project, The Water Poets: Aqueous Poetics, 1630-1820, examines the figures of sea-going and submersion in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English poetry in relation to histories of salvage and submarine science. Another ongoing inquiry, Waves and Places, works between narratology and geographic theory to explore literatures of sea-level rise, with a special focus on the status of oceanic—and more broadly liquid—place.

 

At the Sydney Environment Institute, Killian was research leader for the Unsettling Ecological Poetics and Ocean Ontologies projects. He is an Associate of the Oceanic Humanities for the Global South research group. The Association for the Study of Literature and Environment featured Killian as its scholar of the month in early 2021. In 2023, he will serve as Visiting Fellow at the Institute of the Humanities & Global Culture at the University of Virginia.

[field_location]


12:00-1:30 pm (EST) | Wilson 142
Thu Feb 23
(RESCHEDULED) Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

(RESCHEDULED) Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

Julia Thomas grew up in the coal country of southwest Virginia. Her sharp interest in environmental questions comes from her love of those mountains. As an intellectual historian of Japan, Thomas writes about concepts of nature and the Anthropocene, political thought, historiography, and photography as a political practice. Her publications include Reconfiguring Modernity: Concepts of Nature in Japanese Political Ideology (winner of the AHA John K. Fairbank Prize), Japan at Nature's Edge: The Environmental Context of a Global Power, and Rethinking Historical Distance and many essays, including three ("The Cataracts of Time: Wartime Images and the Case of Japan," "Not Yet Far Enough: The Environmental Turn" and "History and Biology in the Anthropocene: Questions of Scale, Questions of Value") in the American Historical Review.

 

Her most recent books are Altered Earth: Getting the Anthropocene Right (Cambridge University Press, 2022); The Anthropocene: A Multidisciplinary Approach, co-authored with geologists Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams (Polity, 2020); a co-edited collection, Visualizing Fascism: The Twentieth-Century Rise of the Global Right (Duke 2020); and, with Jan Zalasiewicz, Strata and Three Stories (Rachel Carson Center, Munich, 2020).  She's currently at work on The Historian's Task in the Anthropocene (under contract with Princeton University Press).

[field_location]


10:30 AM-12:00 PM (ET) | Wilson Hall 142
Thu Mar 16
Ian Baucom, TBA

Ian Baucom, TBA

[field_location]


TBD | Wilson Hall 142

News & Announcements

Thu Feb 02
Premodern Encounters Colloquium, "Race and Empire in the Premodern World"

Premodern Encounters Colloquium, "Race and Empire in the Premodern World"

Speakers for this colloqium event are Shao-yun Yang, Denison University, author of The Way of the Barbarians: Redrawing Ethnic Boundaries in Tang and Song China (2019) and Michael Gomez, NYU, author of African Dominion: A New History of Empire in Early and Medieval West Africa (2018).

 

Each colloquium brings together two scholars whose recent work engages with similar themes from different cultural and temporal eras. Rather than delivering formal talks, speakers will initiate a dialogue that places their related works in conversation. Participants are encouraged to have read their books in advance and will be invited to attend a casual pre-discussion of these works prior to the colloquium. Hard copy and .pdfs of scholarship will be made available to colloquium participants upon request.  Contact Deborah McGrady (dlm4z@virginia.edu) for information.

[field_location]


5:00-7:00 PM (EST) | In Person (Location TBD)
Fri Feb 03
Samhita Sunya, Mellon Book Talk, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay"

Samhita Sunya, Mellon Book Talk, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay"

Samhita Sundya is an assistant professor of cinema in the department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Her interests span world film history, feminist historiography, informal practices of media distribution across South / West Asia and the Indian Ocean, intersections of audio-visual media and literary forms, and sound studies. Her book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema Via Bombay (U California Press 2022) historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War and renders an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. She currently directs the undergraduate Distinguished Majors Program in MESALC at UVA and serves on the executive committee of the Screen Arts and Culture forum of the Modern Language Association. 

[field_location]


10-11:30 AM EST | Online
Thu Feb 16
Killian Quigley (ACU), "Depth Figures: Oceanic Futures, Submarine Remains”

Killian Quigley (ACU), "Depth Figures: Oceanic Futures, Submarine Remains”

Register here.

 

Dr Killian Quigley

Dr Killian Quigley is Research Fellow at the Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences. He earned his PhD in English at Vanderbilt, where he specialized in the relationship between natural history and the aesthetics of spectacle in eighteenth-century Britain and France. He was subsequently awarded the inaugural postdoc at the Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney.

 

Killian’s primary works reside at the intersections of the environmental humanities, literary studies, the history and philosophy of science, and aesthetic theory. His first book, Reading Underwater Wreckage: An Encrusting Ocean (2023), furnishes a novel theoretical model for interpreting shipwrecks and other drowned matters as junctures of artefact and ecofact, human remains and emergent ecologies, and so forth. A second, and well-advanced project, The Water Poets: Aqueous Poetics, 1630-1820, examines the figures of sea-going and submersion in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English poetry in relation to histories of salvage and submarine science. Another ongoing inquiry, Waves and Places, works between narratology and geographic theory to explore literatures of sea-level rise, with a special focus on the status of oceanic—and more broadly liquid—place.

 

At the Sydney Environment Institute, Killian was research leader for the Unsettling Ecological Poetics and Ocean Ontologies projects. He is an Associate of the Oceanic Humanities for the Global South research group. The Association for the Study of Literature and Environment featured Killian as its scholar of the month in early 2021. In 2023, he will serve as Visiting Fellow at the Institute of the Humanities & Global Culture at the University of Virginia.

[field_location]


12:00-1:30 pm (EST) | Wilson 142
Thu Feb 23
(RESCHEDULED) Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

(RESCHEDULED) Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

Julia Thomas grew up in the coal country of southwest Virginia. Her sharp interest in environmental questions comes from her love of those mountains. As an intellectual historian of Japan, Thomas writes about concepts of nature and the Anthropocene, political thought, historiography, and photography as a political practice. Her publications include Reconfiguring Modernity: Concepts of Nature in Japanese Political Ideology (winner of the AHA John K. Fairbank Prize), Japan at Nature's Edge: The Environmental Context of a Global Power, and Rethinking Historical Distance and many essays, including three ("The Cataracts of Time: Wartime Images and the Case of Japan," "Not Yet Far Enough: The Environmental Turn" and "History and Biology in the Anthropocene: Questions of Scale, Questions of Value") in the American Historical Review.

 

Her most recent books are Altered Earth: Getting the Anthropocene Right (Cambridge University Press, 2022); The Anthropocene: A Multidisciplinary Approach, co-authored with geologists Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams (Polity, 2020); a co-edited collection, Visualizing Fascism: The Twentieth-Century Rise of the Global Right (Duke 2020); and, with Jan Zalasiewicz, Strata and Three Stories (Rachel Carson Center, Munich, 2020).  She's currently at work on The Historian's Task in the Anthropocene (under contract with Princeton University Press).

[field_location]


10:30 AM-12:00 PM (ET) | Wilson Hall 142
Thu Mar 16
Ian Baucom, TBA

Ian Baucom, TBA

[field_location]


TBD | Wilson Hall 142

The Institute of the Humaities and Global Cultures is pleased to have offered dissertation prospectus development fellowships for three graduate stduents working across departments in the College of Arts & Sciences: Brittany AcorsIsabelle Ostertag, and Rebekah K. Latour.

Brittany Acors (PhD student, Religious...

For the 2022-23 academic year, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures is pleased to welcome Elizabeth Shanks Alexander (Religious Studies) and Oludamini Ogunnaike (Religious Studies) as faculty fellows! Learn More

The IHGC is excited to support three working groups from 2022 to Fall 2023: the Environmental Humanities (EH) working group, Global Histories and Transgender Studies in the Humanities, and a multi-disciplinary and multi-school group to understand listening on individual, interpersonal, and systemic levels. Learn More

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

Learn More

Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

Learn More